A Walk At Kanaka Creek Cliff Falls

“After a day’s walk, everything has twice its usual value.”

We picked Mom up Saturday afternoon and headed to Kanaka Creek Regional Park for a walk to the Cliff Falls and the Salmon Hatchery.  Kanaka Creek Park is in the city of Maple Ridge a 40 minute drive from Vancouver.  The weather promised sunshine and 20 degrees (celsius) but big grey clouds obscured the sun most of the afternoon although no rain ever came and our walk was comfortable ; we welcomed the cooler air as we warmed our muscles hiking up and down hills and our extra layers started to come off. Over wood bridges with rushing water underfoot and vantage points to stop and see the falls shooting over the rock face, this is an easy hike although there are a few stairs and hills that might not be the best for parents pushing children in strollers.

We followed the Canyon Trail Loop most of the way for about 2kms then veered off to visit the Bell Irving Hatchery where  Coho, Chum, and Pink Salmon fry (babies) are released during the Spring into Kanaka Creek. They will find their way to the Fraser River and eventually make their journey to the great Pacific Ocean.

The trails are well kept and lined by cedarwood post fences draped in the typical emerald green Cranesbill moss that grows on everything in the dampness of the forest here. Salal, Blackberry bushes and ferns hide the creek from view from the cliffs below. The forest in Summer is lush and the sweet petrichor from the rainfall the night before floats in the air with earthy notes mixed with cedar and fir.

These are the photos I took during our walk.  Take your time, breathe easy and enjoy a stroll through the forest with me.

Love,

Jennifer

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Always be Bear aware when walking in the woods

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The trails lined by tall cedars dripping with old man’s beard lichens

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Couldn’t get my camera to focus on an inch worm crawling on my sweatshirt.

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I like to find faces in the rocks. Can you see a Green man of the woods?

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A variety of species growing up a moss covered tree: Ferns and Fungi

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Coral Fungi

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Red Elderberries

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The Sword Ferns were still dripping with moisture from the rainfall yesterday.

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This rock jutting out from behind this tree reminded me of a turtle.

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Keeping track of what trail we’re on.

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The strong currents of Kanaka Creek have literally drilled holes into the rock.

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THANK YOU!

 

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